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Segrelles reaches perfection with ‘Don Quixote’ and ‘The Carnival of Venice’ as star topics.  So much so that since 2005 every winner of the Cervantes Prize for Literature receives a copy of the novel, illustrated by the artist, accompanied by an original drawing as a dedication. It is a book that has become part of the official protocol.
The collection of original paintings that illustrate this deluxe edition of Don Quixote by Cervantes is exhibited in the town museum of Alcalá de Henares, which was the birthplace of Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra, the famous creator ‘Don Quixote’ .
Impressionism marked Segrelles’ artwork with its aesthetic imprint. The Levantine light and landscapes, farms and noble, humble traditions are assiduously reflected in his canvases, which are made from sketch to canvas with colored rotundity and realism. The luxury of detail and elements is depicted through abundance of oil paint.
Tradition and work, effort and exhibition, are emerging creative combinations of his art skills.
He was born in Albaida in 1936, to a family of artists. His father, Ramiro Segrelles Albert, died in 1946, had also been a painter, like his famous uncle José Segrelles Albert (1885-1969). The young Eustaquio dreamt of being an artist, and that is why he studied Fine Arts and improved his skills. At age 18 he started to paint with oil and developed a penchant for drawing. At that age, with discipline and talent, he entered the publishing world as an illustrator. He began to exhibit at 21 years of age.
Segrelles developed an intense career as an artist, and devoted himself day by day to his vocation. He created about 10,000 paintings of all sizes durgin his life, denoting  a great artistic capacity. If we should describe his way of working with only two words, we would say’ balanced composition’. Whether it be seafood or fruits of the field, among all there is a visually recognizable balance, a scene focus, with the characters in their tasks, unaware of the eyes which are observing every vein, every point, every artistic breath. Compact crowds of farmers and fishers with the same old tools which are never modern or mechanised. There is no gasoline to move tractors in those canvases, no engines that push against the swell, and sweat smells of oil and not of human odors produced by the intense effort.

María del Rosario Caballero Pallás
Journalist and writer